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One More Barrier Faced by Women in Science

0SHARESShare Last week I peed all over myself in the name of studying climate change in Alaska. Gender barriers in science don’t always take an obvious form, and they get especially perilous in below-zero temperatures. Some of these involve individual’s malice or misogyny, but there is another set of barriers that simply result from being a woman in a male ...

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One More Barrier Faced by Women in Science

0SHARESShare Last week I peed all over myself in the name of studying climate change in Alaska. Gender barriers in science don’t always take an obvious form, and they get especially perilous in below-zero temperatures. Some of these involve individual’s malice or misogyny, but there is another set of barriers that simply result from being a woman in a male ...

Read More »

To Change Politics, Do More Than March for Science

0SHARESShare Earlier this year scientists announced that on April 22—Earth Day—they intended to, in their own words, “walk out of the lab and into the streets.” Organizers of this March for Science were dismayed by a new administration and a Congress pushing policies likely to increase pollution, harm health, reduce our ability to forecast natural hazards such as hurricanes—and toss ...

Read More »

To Change Politics, Do More Than March for Science

0SHARESShare Earlier this year scientists announced that on April 22—Earth Day—they intended to, in their own words, “walk out of the lab and into the streets.” Organizers of this March for Science were dismayed by a new administration and a Congress pushing policies likely to increase pollution, harm health, reduce our ability to forecast natural hazards such as hurricanes—and toss ...

Read More »

To Change Politics, Do More Than March for Science

0SHARESShare Earlier this year scientists announced that on April 22—Earth Day—they intended to, in their own words, “walk out of the lab and into the streets.” Organizers of this March for Science were dismayed by a new administration and a Congress pushing policies likely to increase pollution, harm health, reduce our ability to forecast natural hazards such as hurricanes—and toss ...

Read More »

We Just Breached the 410 PPM Threshold for CO2

0SHARESShare The world just passed another round-numbered climate milestone. Scientists predicted it would happen this year and lo and behold, it has. On Tuesday, the Mauna Loa Observatory recorded its first-ever carbon dioxide reading in excess of 410 parts per million (it was 410.28 ppm in case you want the full deal). Carbon dioxide hasn’t reached that height in millions ...

Read More »

We Just Breached the 410 PPM Threshold for CO2

0SHARESShare The world just passed another round-numbered climate milestone. Scientists predicted it would happen this year and lo and behold, it has. On Tuesday, the Mauna Loa Observatory recorded its first-ever carbon dioxide reading in excess of 410 parts per million (it was 410.28 ppm in case you want the full deal). Carbon dioxide hasn’t reached that height in millions ...

Read More »

We Just Breached the 410 PPM Threshold for CO2

0SHARESShare The world just passed another round-numbered climate milestone. Scientists predicted it would happen this year and lo and behold, it has. On Tuesday, the Mauna Loa Observatory recorded its first-ever carbon dioxide reading in excess of 410 parts per million (it was 410.28 ppm in case you want the full deal). Carbon dioxide hasn’t reached that height in millions ...

Read More »

The Seafloor Is Eroding Faster Than Scientists Thought

0SHARESShare A trip to a coral reef off the coast of the Florida Keys, an outdated nautical chart and an argument with a boat captain led biogeochemist Kimberly Yates to make a starting discovery: The seafloor around parts of the continent is breaking away, much more than scientists had previously assumed. Yates, an oceanographer with the U.S. Geological Survey’s St. ...

Read More »

The Seafloor Is Eroding Faster Than Scientists Thought

0SHARESShare A trip to a coral reef off the coast of the Florida Keys, an outdated nautical chart and an argument with a boat captain led biogeochemist Kimberly Yates to make a starting discovery: The seafloor around parts of the continent is breaking away, much more than scientists had previously assumed. Yates, an oceanographer with the U.S. Geological Survey’s St. ...

Read More »