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Tag Archives: Scientific American

Dogging It: Turning Wild Foxes into Man's Second-Best Friend

0SHARESShare Evolution Science Talk Evolutionary biologist and science historian Lee Dugatkin talks about the legendary six-decade Siberian experiment in fox domestication run by Lyudmila Trut, his co-author of a new book and Scientific American article about the research. 0SHARESShare

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Can Tech Meant to Explore Space Answer Vital Questions about Breast Cancer?

0SHARESShare LA CAÑADA FLINTRIDGE, Calif. — For decades, scientists here at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have sent spacecraft deep into the solar system. Now, they’re exploring another mysterious terrain: the human breast. The lab’s primary mission, of course, is to dream up and create robotic spacecraft to look for water on Mars or peer below the dense clouds that shroud ...

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Can Tech Meant to Explore Space Answer Vital Questions about Breast Cancer?

0SHARESShare LA CAÑADA FLINTRIDGE, Calif. — For decades, scientists here at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have sent spacecraft deep into the solar system. Now, they’re exploring another mysterious terrain: the human breast. The lab’s primary mission, of course, is to dream up and create robotic spacecraft to look for water on Mars or peer below the dense clouds that shroud ...

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Can Tech Meant to Explore Space Answer Vital Questions about Breast Cancer?

0SHARESShare LA CAÑADA FLINTRIDGE, Calif. — For decades, scientists here at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have sent spacecraft deep into the solar system. Now, they’re exploring another mysterious terrain: the human breast. The lab’s primary mission, of course, is to dream up and create robotic spacecraft to look for water on Mars or peer below the dense clouds that shroud ...

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Virginity, Fertility or Just Chocolate? The Opaque History of the Easter Bunny

The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. While you’re biting the heads off your chocolate bunnies this weekend, you might wonder how cartoon rabbits became so central to our Easter celebrations. It’s tempting to assume that because there’s no biblical basis for the Easter Bunny, rabbits and hares have no ...

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Paleo Profile: The Moab Lizard

Six years ago, shortly after I moved to Utah, I took a short drive down the highway to Brigham Young University’s Museum of Paleontology . I was hungry to get acquainted with the dinosaurs of my new desert home, and I knew the Mormon college’s little museum had a few I hadn’t seen before. One of them, a blunt-skulled sauropod, stood ...

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New Evidence for Hydrothermal Havens in Enceladus

Since the discovery of the mysteriously warm ‘tiger stripe’ crevasses and the remarkable geyser-like plumes of water vapor erupting from Enceladus’s southern regions, this icy moon has gone from an afterthought to a prime target for astrobiology. During the years of the Cassini mission’s avatar-like presence in the Saturnian system we’ve seen increasingly convincing evidence that Enceladus is a lot ...

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Traces of Genetic Trauma Can Be Tweaked

In recent years researchers have learned that trauma can be inherited —passed down due to changes in DNA, what’s known as epigenetics . But researchers recently uncovered a new wrinkle to the story:  “The effects of trauma which can be transmitted to the offspring can be reversed by a positive experience.” That’s Isabelle Mansuy, professor of neuroepigenetics at the University ...

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Looking Camarasaurus in the Mouth

Camarasaurus has always had something of an image problem. While the other sauropods of Late Jurassic time have often been depicted as slender and elegant (think Diplodocus) or towering and impressive (Brachiosaurus, naturally), poor Camarasaurus is usually restored as a stocky dinosaur with a goofy smile of spoon-shaped teeth. I’m uncertain how far a new study by paleontologists Kayleigh Wiersma and Martin ...

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Are These Trilobite Eggs?

Pyrite fossil of the trilobite Triarthrus eatoni. Eggs visible upper right. Scale bar 5 mm. Credit: Hegna et al. 2017 One of the enduring mysteries of the beloved but long-extinct animals called trilobites is this: how did they reproduce? Despite long searching, no eggs or obvious reproductive equipment has ever observed on the scuttling, armored animals, whose fossils are famous ...

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